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About the APML

APML logoFounded in 2004 the Association of Pall Mall Libraries grew out of an informal gathering of librarians working in the gentlemen’s clubs of London, but has grown to incorporate other club libraries, and also a number of independent and subscription-based professional libraries, both at home and abroad.

The APML aims to promote the sharing of skills, knowledge and resources between members, and to increase knowledge of the collections held by their respective institutions and, in doing so, to develop its potential as a lively, multi-talented and innovative group.

You can join in discussions of a professional nature, by applying to join our JISCMail group.

All change at the British Academy library!

Guest blog from Karen Syrett

The hiring out of our public rooms provides an important source of revenue for the British Academy. Although the bayed library with its views over The Mall meant that I had a fantastic office, it was a very under-used room. So, it came as no surprise when the Academy finally decided to re-configure the library in order to add the room to its portfolio of event spaces.

To enable the necessary building work, a total of 8,944 books had to be moved out of the library but, as the work took place in various stages, they didn’t all need to be moved in one go. The project took place over the summer, our quietest time of the year, so neither storage nor time was an issue. I decided to undertake the work myself and to factor in a bit of a spring clean as well! The move also provided an ideal opportunity for a long overdue stock-check.

To start the project, new bookcases were built in two rooms on the second floor – the meeting room and the new Fellows’ Room. Once these rooms were ready, I was able to load up my trolley and begin moving the 3,442 books designated for the new shelves. Working out how to arrange the book collection was the hardest part of the whole project. The British Academy Fellowship is organised into 18 academic sections and the library follows that structure. I wanted to make sure that books belonging to one section stayed together and that the new arrangement was coherent – this involved a lot of maths! Luckily the two literature sections fitted into the meeting room, so they were the first books to go to their new home upstairs. History and archaeology form the majority of the Academy’s books so I wanted to keep these books downstairs in the new library. That left the rest of the collection for the Fellows’ Room. Trying to figure it all out was like doing battle with a complicated jigsaw – especially when some last minute changes to the rooms meant I suddenly had fewer shelves!

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The old library

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Making a start

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That didn’t stay clean for long!

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The first trolley load is ready to go

It took 2 weeks to move the books upstairs but once they had all gone, it was time to pack up the remaining 5,502. When boxing up these books, I was careful to label the boxes as I went and to make sure that the boxes were all packed in the same way so that re-shelving the books later would be as straightforward as possible. In addition to giving the books a bit of a clean, it was also very satisfying to get them back into their proper order – needless to say I’m a bit tetchy these days when I notice that someone has put a book back in the wrong place! During the stock-checking process I identified around 500 books that could be disposed of, so I contacted Dan at The Book Rescuers to arrange for the unwanted books to be collected. The Book Rescuers work with charities in Africa to give children the vital chance of an education – none of the books end up in landfill. You can read more about them here: http://www.bookrescuers.com. The remaining boxes were stored in the Reading Room until the new library was finished, fortunately there was help on hand to move the boxes – there were well over 200. The last thing to move out of the library was me – I now occupy an office on the third floor. It took several weeks to transform the library space which gave me plenty of time to recover from phase 1!

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I was busy packing boxes when the Queen went by!

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Inevitably the building work overran so I didn’t have much time to get the books back on to the new library shelves before the first event was due to take place. Although I managed to get all the boxes emptied in time, there was still some fine tuning to do. Eventually all of the books were accommodated and there is even some room to allow for growth. Needless to say, the new library has proved incredibly popular, in its first year it has been used for everything from conferences to fashion shows!

The new library set up for its first dinner

The new library set up for its first dinner

RDA: an introduction [Presentation to Association of Pall Mall Libraries, 25th April 2016 at Royal Astronomical Society, by Alan Danskin]

27/06/2016

Guest blog by Danny Smith, Royal Automobile Club

Firstly, for those unfamiliar with the Association of Pall Mall Libraries (APML), here is a brief explanation of its history and purpose as it appears on the organisation’s website. Founded in 2004, APML “grew out of an informal gathering of librarians working in the gentlemen’s clubs of London, but has grown to incorporate other club libraries, and also a number of independent and subscription-based professional libraries, both at home and abroad. The APML aims to promote the sharing of skills, knowledge and resources between members, and to increase knowledge of the collections held by their respective institutions and, in doing so, to develop its potential as a lively, multi-talented and innovative group.” For further information please see http://www.apmlibraries.org.

A key aspect of APML’s work is in its organisation of training for its constituent members, co-ordinated by the Training Subgroup. Such sessions cover a broad range of subjects reflecting the broad range of issues that librarians of APML institutions, often solo librarians or members of small teams, are faced with. These circumstances typically require librarians to be all-rounders rather than experts in one field such as cataloguing, and so training sessions delivered by those who are experts, such as Alan Danksin, are very helpful.

Sian Prosser, Librarian and Archivist at the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), kindly organised and hosted this session. For those who have not visited, RAS is situated in Burlington House, Piccadilly, alongside institutions such as the Royal Academy, the Geological Society and the Linnean Society. On this occasion we were stationed in a lecture theatre on the ground floor, though we were lucky enough to be able to take tea in the Council Room and also pop in to the Library itself before we began, where there was a small but interesting display featuring books, photographs and models of the moon. Highlights included the map of the moon in Giovanni Battista Riccioli’s Almagestum novum (1653) and Johannes Hevelius’ Selenographiaof 1674.

Thirty people filled the lecture theatre for Alan’s session, mainly members of APML and/or the London Learned & Professional Societies Librarians’ Group (LLPSLG – similar in purpose to APML and with some cross-membership), with CIG contributing eight attendees. In an afternoon, three hours to be precise, Alan covered a great deal of ground.

As I found whilst studying for my library qualification at UCL, an understanding of the theory and background to the technical skills of our profession such as cataloguing are extremely helpful when later attempting to put said skills into practice, and so Alan’s initial points regarding the origins of RDA, it’s governance, purpose and FRBR origins were all very useful. The working through of examples to show the practical implications of FRBR and concepts such as attributes, entities, the distinction between Works, Expressions, Manifestations and Items and so on, was particularly welcomed. In order to be able to adequately apply ‘cataloguer judgement’ an understanding of this information is essential.

The next section covered the implementation of RDA, beginning, inevitably, with cost. Alan spoke here from personal experience at the British Library, and so it was difficult to imagine how implementation of RDA in a library such as my own or a similar institution within APML or LLPSLG might be achieved.  Naturally the ambitions, collections and resources of the BL are vastly different from our own and so the potential benefits and pitfalls of RDA implementation are equally different. However, as indicated in his title Alan’s intention was to provide an introduction to RDA rather than a targeted analysis of its suitability for APML and LLPSLG libraries, so this is not a criticism. The business case benefits of RDA listed by Alan, increased discovery, interoperability within and outside of the library community, embracing web technologies etc., are more universally applicable.

A significant undertaking in an implementation would be the necessary training and re-training of staff. A demonstration of the RDA toolkit was given which was perhaps the first time that some attendees had seen it, and it was interesting to note the possibilities that such a toolkit provides in comparison with traditional documentation. Translations, workflows, policy statements and full examples were all appealing, and there is interest among some attendees in trying the month-long free trial and subsequently comparing notes. Sadly, there appears to be little hands-on RDA training available in the UK, and so users are reliant on interpretation of the materials provided by the Library of Congress and the toolkit itself.

Alan’s third section dealt with ‘Application’, in essence, actually cataloguing in RDA. He provided a quick primer to act as a guide to the terminology and concepts used in RDA, before moving on to the core elements, pointing out that “core is the floor, not the ceiling.” Two key points delivered here were firstly, the absence of the ‘Rule of Three’ that appears in AACR2 regarding iteration (i.e. one or more instances of an attribute), as RDA allows the cataloguer to record all, some, the first or none of the instances (unless core).  The second point was the concept in RDA of ‘preferred sources’ rather than the ‘chief source’ outlined in AACR2. Though RDA’s preferred source of information is still the source containing the title proper it allows the cataloguer to consult other sources as dictated by an order of priority outlined in instructions (not rules) 2.2.2.2 – 2.2.2.4. These were what I considered to be the two key points, though Alan also covered transcription choices (language, script, capitalization) and authorized access points.

It is over fifteen years since it was first declared that ‘MARC Must Die’ (http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2002/10/ljarchives/marc-must-die/) and yet it still remains. In the final section, ‘Future Developments and Strategy’, Alan covered the problems of accommodating RDA records in MARC, such as the conflation of information related to a work, expression, manifestation and item, before discussing the future. Bibframe was proffered as a possible replacement for MARC, with ‘possible’ emphasized, and a demonstration of an RDA record without MARC was given as we were shown an RDA record in RIMMF (RDA in Many Metadata Formats). Alan also explained the potential application of RDA in the semantic web as linked data, but due to time constraints there wasn’t an option to fully investigate these aspects, which was unfortunate given their fundamental importance. They are of course all works in progress also.

In sum, in a three hour session a lot was covered and certainly a good introduction to RDA provided. I left with lots of questions which I consider to be a good sign, and Alan provided some links at the end for further research. Many thanks to Alan for his talk, and to Sian for organising.

Originally published on the CILIP Cataloguing and Index Group blog.

A Word about Wikipedia

When I was a LIS student I wrote in my dissertation about the evils of Wikipedia as a source of information even though – like most of us I suspect – I use it all the time. However – again like most of us – I would always verify it against other sources if I was using it for something significant.

This week at work the Power of Wiki was brought home to me. Big Time.

During a presentation on the forthcoming Club History which as Archivist, I have helped research, but which I had to miss, a Club member stood up and said something like ‘why have you included nothing about ‘X’, when everyone knows he was a member?’ ‘X’ I might add was a very famous figure in Military History.

This flummoxed the author who confronted me the next day (the publication has already gone to press by the way)and I demonstrated by showing him the Membership Lists for the relevant period, that ‘X’ was never a Member. Somewhat puzzled by the assertion (as no-one has never mentioned to me that he might have been), I checked to find the source of this rumour and….perhaps unsurprisingly, found that it was in a Wikipedia entry on the Club which cited as its provenance a British Tabloid Newspaper article. You know the sort: ‘past members include….’

I quickly edited the article (the first time I have ever done anything like that), but realised that this may be too late as for some, various myths have probably already become ‘facts’.

The moral of this is: take control of Wikipedia before it takes control of you. I intend to learn much more about how to edit articles on there so that we can get the Club’s official version of events which after all we have spent a year researching, out there, so that years hence my successor will not have to face such an uncomfortable scenario.

Wikipedia is a wonderful concept but, it is only as good as the Wikipedians. Or, if you want to put it more bluntly: If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em.

Developments in Copyright Law

Guest blog from Sian Prosser of the Royal Astronomical society

Conference report: Keeping Within the Lines: Approaches to Copyright in Art and Design Archives (London Metropolitan Archives, 13 March 2015)

sian1In March I attended a copyright study day organised byARLIS Committee for Art & Design Archives in partnership with The National Archives’ ‘Archiving the Arts’ initiative. In spite of the art and design focus, this event covered issues relevant to anyone looking after library and archive collections. It was a chance to learn about recent changes in copyright legislation that affect archives, and to explore challenges and opportunities in the use of copyright-protected archive material in exhibitions or publications.

Changes to copyright law

The first speaker was Benjamin White, Head of Intellectual Property at the British Library. He gave an update on changes to UK copyright law in 2014 that affect the work of archivists. Many of the key changes have been summed up in a series of documents created by the Intellectual Property Office (IPO), including a leaflet about changes in exceptions to copyrightthat affect libraries, archives and museums. For example:

– It is now possible to make multiple digital copies of materials for preservation purposes.

– Copying for research and private study used to be limited to literary, dramatic and artistic works, but is now extended to sound recordings and films.

Other relevant changes in exceptions include the following:

– Section 30 used to be an exception that allowed quotation for criticism and review. This exception has now been widened to cover any reasonable quotation, including illustrative use, not just review (see p. 5). As the leaflet points out, this is good news for authors, academics and casual bloggers.

– Section 31 used to be an exception that allowed accessible copies to be made for people with visual impairments. This exception has now been widened to apply to all impairments that prevent equal access.

– Section 32 relates to the fair dealing exception for instruction. Now, copyrighted works in any medium can be copied for use in a teaching environment as long as certain conditions are met.

Orphan works: exception and licensing

Despite these relaxations in copyright exceptions, Benjamin White pointed out that during this parliament, there will be no change to the law that unpublished works remain in copyright until 2039. Two recent developments provide two routes to making such works available to the public: the orphan works exception, and the orphan works licensing scheme. Both routes have limitations. The EU orphan works directive has now been implemented in the UK, and this exception can be used by libraries, archives and museums. It does NOT apply to standalone artistic works.

A diligent search for copyright owners is required, and the details have to be registered on the OHIM database in Brussels. If the rights holder materialises later on, they would have a claim to reasonable remuneration.

As for licensing, the Intellectual Property Office has launched a scheme to allow people to apply for licences to copy orphan works, including standalone artistic works. The IPO receives the licence fee on behalf of relevant collecting societies. One problem with this scheme is that the collecting societies want licences to last for a limited amount of time e.g. 5 years, but this doesn’t correspond with the way that digitisation projects are funded.

Copyright and digitisation

Victoria Stobo gave an excellent talk on how archives are tackling copyright clearance when digitising collections. She gave several examples of how certain institutions in the US and UK are managing risk, as detailed in the slides which she has kindly allowed to be shared in this blog post.

The cost of rights clearance can outstrip the cost of digitisation and the monetary value of the material to be digitised. Across the sector, there is a clear tendency for digitisation strategies to focus on depositor copyright materials or public domain material, leading to an incomplete digital public record. The case studies showed how institutions like the Wellcome Library used risk management to achieve their digitisation objectives, and went through the procedure of obtaining rights clearance.

Although there were varying rates of response from rights holders across the different case studies, respondents tended to grant permission for digitisation, and they often do so without asking for a fee (in the case of the Wellcome Library’s Codebreakersproject, 84% of rights holders were identified, 77% were contacted, and 98 % of those who responded granted permission). Rights holder concerns are not always about copyright. Content and sensitivity is important, and the age of material is important, particularly for artists and writers.

It turns out that carrying out rights clearance can have a positive impact. For example, archivists have found that getting in touch with depositors has led to them becoming involved in outreach and fundraising. It establishes trust and increases engagement.

During the panel discussion, the speakers shared their top tips for rights clearance: Stobo recommends building six to nine months into a digitisation project for rights clearance, and Ben White advises taking time to explain the positives of digitisation to the rights holder, and never saying permission is needed urgently (even if it is because it’s been left to the last minute).

Case studies

Naomi Korn led an excellent workshop, featuring case studies and exercises in ‘managed risk-taking’. Naomi highlighted the gap between print-oriented legislation and the digital landscape, leading organisations to select items for digitisation on the grounds of lowest risk, thus distorting the historic record. We can fill the gap by doing due diligence, seeking licenses and permission, and having a notice and take down policy. One of the best things about this conference was the chance to work with qualified archivists during the practical sessions, during which I learned that Tim Padfield’s 2004 flowchart of copyright duration is available online (a new edition of Padfield’s Copyright for Archivists and Records Managers is coming out in July).

We also heard from two speakers who looked at the effect of copyright law on creativity. Claudy Op den Kamp gave a paper based on her thesis on the impact of copyright legislation on archival access, focusing on how the EYE Film Institute Netherlands enables access to fragments of unidentifiable moving images in its collections by presenting compilations of these “orphan works par excellence”, and allowing them to be used in found footage film projects.

Artist David Mabb described the impact of copyright on his artistic freedom. The starkest example of this was when his request to display adapted photographs belonging to the Magnum photo agency was met with a threat of legal action. His response to the threat is revealed in this video(7m 10s). Mabb pointed out that copying used to be an accepted part of learning one’s craft, but evolved into a subversive act, as seen in the moustache that Duchamp drew on a postcard of the Mona Lisa, or in the Situationists’ practice of détournement. However, Mabb recognised that copyright stopped the exploitation of artists’ work by other artists, for example, when Jeff Koons based his ‘String of Puppies’ sculpture on Art Rogers’ photograph..

This study day was a great opportunity to learn about the latest changes in copyright legislation, as well as the obstacles that still remain. It’s clear that the constraints of copyright legislation are causing a distortion in the online historical record as material for digitisation is selected on the grounds of copyright compliance. However, there are strategies available for managing the risk involved in making orphan works and other copyright-protected material available to the public.

Victoria Stobo’s presentation

Discovering Hybrid Resources

Guest blog from Gill Briggs of the Royal Horticultural Society

gill1When I volunteered to write something for this blog about what I had learned from Bill Stockting’s talk (Discovering Hybrid Resources) at the last meeting, I hadn’t at the time realised how paltry my knowledge and understanding of some of the tools of our trade really was. Do I really understand the concepts of Linked Data? What exactly is RDF? What does HTTP stand for and why does it matter? Several hours down the line I had gleaned enough information from the world wide web (including a definition of the difference between this and the internet) to be able, hopefully, to enthuse about the opportunities in store for us all as we lay bare our metadata and share like there’s no tomorrow.

Here’s an example. The British Library provides public access to SoCAM – Search our Catalogue Archives and Manuscripts. Mr Stockting demonstrated how a search here for Harold Pinter gives biographical notes and a high level of detail about archives relating to him in the BL, plus some information about other resources which one can go away and search for. Doing the same search in SNAC (Social Networking and Archival Context, under development in the US ), gives the biographical notes which, thanks to some crafty data linking, have been uploaded from the BL metadata. Additionally, resources can be accessed under a range of different headings – person, family and organisations – created by harvesting the data within the available resources rather than just linking the documents.

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There are also direct links to other archival collections similarly organised around the data (at Harvard, and the University of Guelph, for example), a picture from Wikipedia, a list of other collection locations and a nifty radial graph diagram which shows at a glance that Edna O’Brien was not only connected to Mr P but also to Philip Roth and Elizabeth Jane Howard. A world of information at my fingertips, allowing me to refine my search to take me in the direction I want to go, rather than aimlessly following hyperlinks to mystery destinations.

Is it the future? I hope so, and the quicker the better.

Ten Years of the APML

kath5Last night (Thursday 20th November) we were lucky enough to be able to celebrate our Tenth Anniversary with a lecture from James Campbell, author of the wonderful tome of ‘library porn’ known as The Library : a World History (Thames & Hudson, should you feel tempted…and frankly you should!) Campbell’s talk was both illuminating and entertaining – his assertion that Roman Librarians were basically ‘highly educated slaves’ had most of the Librarians in fits of giggles (of self recognition?).

10yrsWe also learned that- contrary to the image we have thanks to books like The Name of The Rose,western monastic collections only contained a couple of hundred volumes owing to the fact that each page of parchment was basically a whole sheep and therefore your average bible contained 100 sheep (he never mentioned goats funnily enough)As an Architect himself, he pointed out the design failings of Michelangelo’s library in Florence, citing it as a ‘triumph of aesthetics over practicality’. He noted that the original Wren design for Trinity College was a round building featuring a ‘throne for the Librarian’ and added that actually, round libraries are ‘useless for putting books in’.

In addition to this we learned that Bats were used in Rome to keep insects off books. This pleased the public as they never saw them – their activities being at night – but not, presumably the staff of the libraries who had to clear the bat dung every morning!

Oh and in case you wondered why your photos don’t look as good as those in the book: each shot is an amalgamation of around 100 images taken at different exposures and overlaid so that every area of the photo is equally well exposed.

All in all, it was a great evening (and I know what I want for Christmas).

Forthcoming events from Kath Posner, APML Chair

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Back from my holidays with loads of news of events organised by members of APML

 

 

Firstly via CILIP’s Library and Information History Group:
Lonely hearts, wedding bells and illicit pleasures: a far from sentimental journey of how London loved in print
When: Friday 19 September 2014, 18.00-19.30
Meeting point: Wellcome Trust, Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE

This walk will carry you back through time to learn how the printing press often played a crucial role in the varying experiences of romance, love and relationships. Singletons and couples are invited to spend ninety minutes discovering how Londoners of the past might set about finding their match and hearing from the literature that recorded such journeys.

In the company of Alice Ford-Smith (Bernard Quaritch Ltd), Lonely Hearts, Wedding Bells and Illicit Pleasures will uncover tales across the relationship spectrum. From Bloomsbury to the streets around Covent Garden, you will hear accounts of loneliness, friendship, love, passion, scandal, jealousy and exploitation. Books are behind them all, accompanied by the occasional librarian and many a person of business.

The walk’s meeting point will be the Wellcome Trust’s headquarters on Euston Road and we will begin with viewing a display of related material from the Wellcome Library collections. After which, we will set out to explore the streets of London. The walk ends at approximately 7.30pm not far from Charing Cross. Please be ready for no breaks and the occasional saucy storyline!

Numbers are limited to 20 people, and pre-booking is essential. Tickets, which are non-refundable, are £10 each. Please email Renae Satterley (r.satterley@middletemple.org.uk) to reserve your place. This event is open to all, so early booking is recommended.

Secondly – from the Westminster History Club

The new season of talks begins on Tuesday 23rd September at 7pm, in The Lord Mayor’s Parlour, Westminster City Hall and you are warmly invited to join us for the fourth season of the Westminster History Club – doors open at 6.30 pm £10 to be paid on arrival.

The Club was set up to raise funds for scholarly research into the history of Westminster by the Victoria County History.  This is as much a social event, held four times a year, with a glass of wine and a talk on some aspect of the history of Westminster by a guest speaker and on 23rd September we welcome  Dr. Paula Henderson to give her talk on:-

“Location, Location, Location – William Cecil’s House in the Strand”..

In 1560 William Cecil, the first Lord Burghley, moved to a new house in the Strand, amongst eminent aristocrats and courtiers who the favoured the location for its connections by river and road between Court, Parliament, the City and Inns of Court. In her illustrated talk, Dr Henderson will tell the important story of how the ambitious Cecil developed his house as a seat of power, designed for the large household needed for running royal business, and his garden for pleasure and entertainment, an escape from the relentless pressure of work.

THE SPEAKER
Paula Henderson is a lecturer and writer on British architecture and garden history.  She has degrees in art history (University of Wisconsin, B.A.; University of Chicago, M.A.) and a Ph.D. in architectural history from the Courtauld Institute of Art (University of London).  Her first book,The Tudor House and Garden: architecture and landscape in the 16th and early 17th centuries (published by Yale University Press).

And last, but not least from CILIP’s Local Studies South Group:

In the picture: getting the most out of images inside and outside your collection.
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 from 10:30 to 16:30
Held at CILIP 7 Ridgmount Street, London WC1E 7AE
Cost: CILIP/ARA members £35 + VAT, non-members £45 + VAT.

The 2014 Local Studies Group South Study Day will be looking at how to use images inside and outside your collection.

Sessions include:
·English Heritage on their purchase of the Aerofilms Aerial Photographic Archive and the creation of the Britain from the Air website.
·The Wellcome Library will be talking about the nuts and bolts of digitisation.
·Librarians from Bracknell Forest will be talking about putting their community’s images onto Flickr.
·An optional tour of either the Camden Local Studies and Archive Centre or the digitisation studios at the Wellcome Library.

Cost: £35 for CILIP/ARA members and £45 for non-members. Lunch, tea and coffee will be provided.
To book, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/in-the-picture-getting-the-most-out-of-images-in-your-collection-tickets-12502498309
For more information please contact Tony Pilmer via tony.pilmer@tiscali.co.uk.

Hope there is something here to tempt you. 
Best wishes
Kath 

A day in the life at the Naval & Military Club (In & Out) by Kath Posner, current APML Chair

kath3So it’s a typical Wednesday here at the In & Out (is there such a thing?)

First thing I do when I arrive at my desk is check my emails. As I only work here two days a week, there are obviously a few to deal with, and a quick scan through determines the urgency.

Most pressing, today was a missive from the Club Historian – an author who is writing a history of the In & Out for which I have been doing some of the research.

I should add at this point that I have been doing a lot of work on the Archives over the past year, sorting out around twenty boxes of random documents stretching back 150 years, some tied with ribbons and others loose, storing them in labelled acid-free files and cateloguing them in an easily-searchable Excel spreadsheet.

Having dealt with this, I went on to answer enquiries from Club Members and members of the General Public about their relatives. This year has seen a marked increase in queries from the Public about relatives: people seem to have developed a huge appetite for genealogy research, whether because of programmes like Who do you think you are, or the centenary of the First World War I do not know, but it is a part of my role which, owing to my Research background, I relish.

After dealing with these I went on to normal Library duties: cataloguing the latest acquisitions, photographing them for the Facebook page and weeding the collection. The In & Out’s collection is almost exclusively Military History, with an emphasis on personal stories and biographies and, as much of it is donated by Members, it requires a great deal of tact when deciding what to accept into the collection.

As well as my In & Out duties, I found time to deal with APML tasks: coordinating the next meeting, which includes a lunch means chasing up guests and ascertaining any special dietary requirements as well as seeing if there are any pressing issues members want to talk about and checking on the needs/availability of speakers. We have an antiquarian books expert from Christie’s coming to speak at the next meeting, which will be great fun. I am also recruiting speakers on Resource Discovery, Genealogy and Conservation, so I am kept busy!

So – that’s been my day so far…..enjoy yours.